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INDIANA SHERIFFS' SEX & VIOLENT OFFENDER REGISTRY

To check on the location of a perpetrator incarcerated within the Indiana Department of Corrections click here

To check on the location/status on a perpetrator being held in a county jail click here

For a national map to check on offenders in other states click here


Effective January 1, 2003, Zachary’s Law requires sheriff departments to jointly establish and maintain the Indiana Sheriffs' Sex & Violent Offender Registry to provide detailed information about individuals who register as sex or violent offenders at Indiana sheriff departments. The purpose of the registry is to inform the general public about the identity, location, and appearance of sex and violent offenders who live, work, or study in Indiana.


Click Here to Search the Registry

Zachary’s Law is named for Zachary Snider of Cloverdale, Indiana. Zachary was 10 years old when he was murdered by a convicted child molester in 1993.

Indiana Code (IC 11-8-8-5) defines a sex and violent offender as:

1. An individual who has been convicted of any of the following offenses:

Sec. 5. (a) Except as provided in section 22 of this chapter, as used in this chapter, "sex or violent offender" means a person convicted of any of the following offenses:

  • (1) Rape (IC 35-42-4-1).
  • (2) Criminal deviate conduct (IC 35-42-4-2).
  • (3) Child molesting (IC 35-42-4-3).
  • (4) Child exploitation (IC 35-42-4-4(b)).
  • (5) Vicarious sexual gratification (including performing sexual conduct in the presence of a minor) (IC 35-42-4-5).
  • (6) Child solicitation (IC 35-42-4-6).
  • (7) Child seduction (IC 35-42-4-7).
  • (8) Sexual misconduct with a minor as a Class A, Class B, or Class C felony (IC 35-42-4-9), unless:
    • (A) the person is convicted of sexual misconduct with a minor as a Class C felony;
    • (B) the person is not more than:
      • (i) four (4) years older than the victim if the offense was committed after June 30, 2007; or
      • (ii) five (5) years older than the victim if the offense was committed before July 1, 2007; and
    • (C) the sentencing court finds that the person should not be required to register as a sex offender.
  • (9) Incest (IC 35-46-1-3).
  • (10) Sexual battery (IC 35-42-4-8).
  • (11) Kidnapping (IC 35-42-3-2), if the victim is less than eighteen (18) years of age, and the person who kidnapped the victim is not the victim's parent or guardian.
  • (12) Criminal confinement (IC 35-42-3-3), if the victim is less than eighteen (18) years of age, and the person who confined or removed the victim is not the victim's parent or guardian.
  • (13) Possession of child pornography (IC 35-42-4-4(c)).
  • (14) Promoting prostitution (IC 35-45-4-4) as a Class B felony.
  • (15) Promotion of human trafficking (IC 35-42-3.5-1(a)(2)) if the victim is less than eighteen (18) years of age.
  • (16) Sexual trafficking of a minor (IC 35-42-3.5-1(b)).
  • (17) Human trafficking (IC 35-42-3.5-1(c)(3)) if the victim is less than eighteen (18) years of age.
  • (18) Murder (IC 35-42-1-1).
  • (19) Voluntary manslaughter (IC 35-42-1-3).
  • (20) An attempt or conspiracy to commit a crime listed in subdivisions (1) through (19).
  • (21) A crime under the laws of another jurisdiction, including a military court, that is substantially equivalent to any of the offenses listed in subdivisions (1) through (20).

(b) The term includes:

  • (1) a person who is required to register as a sex or violent offender in any jurisdiction; and
  • (2) a child who has committed a delinquent act and who:
    • (A) is at least fourteen (14) years of age;
    • (B) is on probation, is on parole, is discharged from a facility by the department of correction, is discharged from a secure private facility (as defined in IC 31-9-2-115), or is discharged from a juvenile detention facility as a result of an adjudication as a delinquent child for an act that would be an offense described in subsection (a) if committed by an adult; and
    • (C) is found by a court by clear and convincing evidence to be likely to repeat an act that would be an offense described in subsection (a) if committed by an adult.

(c) In making a determination under subsection (b)(2)(C), the court shall consider expert testimony concerning whether a child is likely to repeat an act that would be an offense described in subsection (a) if committed by an adult.
As added by P.L.140-2006, SEC.13 and P.L.173-2006, SEC.13. Amended by P.L.216-2007, SEC.13.

  • 2. An individual who has been convicted of attempting to commit or conspiring to commit any of the above-listed offenses;
  • 3. An individual who has been convicted of a crime, convicted of attempting to commit a crime, or convicted of conspiring to commit a crime under the laws of another state or in a military court that is substantially equivalent to any of the above-listed offenses; or
  • 4. A child who is at least 14 years of age and is on probation or parole or is discharged from a facility by the department of correction, discharged from a secure private facility, or discharged from a juvenile detention
  • facility as a result of being adjudicated as a delinquent child for an act that would be an offense listed above if committed by an adult (see IC 31-37-1-1 to -2) and is found by a court to be likely to repeat an act that would be an offense listed above if committed by an adult (see IC 31-37-19-5 (b)(1)).

The following sex and violent offenders are required to register with the Sheriff of the county that has jurisdiction where the offender intends to live, work or study for longer than seven days. That registration must occur within seven days of arriving in each jurisdiction where the offender intends to live, work or study.

  • A sex and violent offender who spends or intends to spend at least 7 days (including part of a day) in Indiana during a 180 day period or an offender who owns real property in Indiana and returns to Indiana at any time,
  • A sex and violent offender who works or carries on a vocation or intends to work or carry on a vocation in Indiana either full-time or part-time for more than 14 days in a row during any calendar year,
  • A sex and violent offender who works or carries on a vocation or intends to work or carry on a vocation in Indiana either full-time or part-time for a total of more than 30 days whether or not they are in a row during any calendar year, and
  • A sex and violent offender who is enrolled or intends to be enrolled on a full-time or part-time basis in any public or private educational institution in Indiana.

When an offender registers with the Sheriff’s Department, these authorities notify all other law enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction in the area where the offender has registered.

Please visit the Indiana Sheriff’s Sex & Violent Offenders frequently asked questions for additional information.

Megan's Law

The History of Megan's Law
In 1995, a convicted child molester was arrested for the rape and murder of 7-year-old Megan Kanka in a New Jersey suburb. The offender lived right across the street from the Kanka home, but the Police Department was prohibited from disclosing the presence of this child molester because the law did not allow the release of sex offender information to the public.

The law, dubbed "Megan's Law," was changed to permit the release of this information to the public. California's version of Megan's Law went into effect on September 25, 1996. This law was implemented to allow viewing of sex offender information in order to allow potential victims to protect themselves and parents to protect their children.

For additional sex offender search engines please see:

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